The 5 Golden Rules of Business Body Language

The guidelines that you bear in mind and never forget about are classified as the Golden rules that always apply. Like torches to guide us in the dark of night, they shine vividly to keep us on course and always propelling in the correct direction.

Golden Rules exist to get used, to be followed religiously, and to show you how. Regardless of what your main purpose is or what challenge you face, the rule is there to latch onto if you start to veer off track. Just find the Golden Rule that applies and abide by it.

Listed here are the 5 Golden Rules of business body language.

Rule # 1.

People usually lean forward and “into you” when they are really interested in what you are presenting, saying, proposing, etc. The rationale behind that is that unconsciously, we lean toward what we like. So, the next time you’re really interested in something someone is saying, take a quick second to check your own body language. You may find that you are actually leaning forward and are glad-fully engaged. Furthermore, the next time you are at a seminar, show, or lecture, look around at other people when interesting or captivating things take place. This observation can help you next time you are pitching your product/service or offering a good suggestion to a potential client.

Rule # 2.

When a person’s shoulder blades are not in line with your own, they are preoccupied. Ever talk to a person who is conversing with you but their body seems to be facing as if they’re set to move past you?

First of all, give them a mental credit for speaking to you while they’re really focused on their next meeting, assignment, errand, etc. Remember that they probably mean well but something in the back (or front) of their mind has got them anxious to fly.

Many times this happens if you happen to catch someone who is on their way somewhere and has stopped to have a few words with you. If this happens when at a networking event or during a one on one sales presentation, you may have to use your smooth gift of gab to help them to focus completely on what you are displaying. As you speak, notice their shoulders coming in line with yours.

Rule # 3.
Arms Folded. This could indicate a person feeling uncomfortable of anxious. A lot of people fold their arms when they are calculating, weighing the facts, and are not feeling confident about the answers.

This could be due to something you are saying, the way you are saying it, or even an individuals general mistrust of you. Not to be taken as offense, you may just need to know each other a little better and establish trust. If the same happens with a person you know reasonably well, it is probably the first reason or just a general feeling of discomfort.

Rule # 4.
Two people talking with their shoulder blades parallel. Have you ever been at a business function and noticed two people talking with their shoulder blades in perfect alignment? This is a good indication that they are involved in a serious or interesting conversation. The aligned shoulder blades say that they are closing the doors to interruption at least temporarily.

Notice that when the same conversation is coming to a close, their shoulder blades and general position of their bodies begin to face an exiting direction. This happens even before the conversation ends. When you are out at business networking events, it’s a sign to now approach without being intrusive.

Rule # 5.
Person is completely facing you but frequently looking away. Usually when a person is completely engaged in a subject, all elements of their being will reflect this. The same holds true when in conversation. Take a look at the person in your next few interactions. Are they giving you regular eye contact?

Typically, when not looking you in the eye, they will say something that exhibits the fact that they are listening or are engaged. If they are constantly looking over your shoulder or into the background, chances are, they are preoccupied.

Once again, don’t be offended, just acknowledge this and pick up the talk at another time if possible. This also depends on the priority level of the talk as well. You will want initiate this carefully and not offend anyone as you cut the conversation short.

You can trust and believe in these Golden Rules to help you better understand business body language. They’ve been time-tested and also have been proved to be true. Follow them carefully and your ultimate success will likely be assured as well as your communications much greater.

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The Importance of Business Body Language

Most of us go about our daily business, and conduct a number of both business and personal conversations without giving much thought to what the body language we use is saying to other people. In business though it really is as much about the way you say something as the actual words you use.

But what does the way you conduct yourself and your conversations say about you, and what might others be thinking?

Eye contact is of course very important. Maintaining eye contact with another person during a conversation is of course the best way to convey that you are truly interested in what they have to say. But there is a fine line between eye contact and out and out staring, which is discomforting to most people. However, beware of those who speak to you without making eye contact at all, as that is often a good indicator that someone is being less than honest with you.

Holding your head up straight while delivering a speech or presentation conveys the right air of authority. However, tilting one’s head to the side occasionally while listening to someone else speak conveys that you are truly interested in what they are saying.

Your hands and arms say a lot in conversation too. Folded arms indicate defensiveness, and can be very off putting to the other parties involved in the conversation, as can having your hands shoved into your pockets. Excessive hand gestures can also detract from your message, so the best place for your hands, during a business conversation at least, is at your side.

When it comes to posture what you learned to do in grade school, sit or stand up straight and tall, applies in the business world too. Slouching indicates a lethargic, disinterested person, who no one will want to do business with.

Watch where you place your legs when seated at a business meeting too. You can often tell if a person is nervous because their legs move about endlessly, which can be off-putting too all at the table. For women, crossing the legs can send out a rather unprofessional signal so if you must do it, cross them at the ankle, not the knee. Guys should avoid the “figure four” resting one leg or ankle on top of the other knee. This is taken by others as a sign of cockiness that can put the observer off you before you ever open your mouth to speak.

12 Secrets For the Busy Home Schooler

Life is busy. We rush from here to there. We rush through our lesson plans. We rush to finish another project with the kids. We rush to make cookies. We rush to church and special events. We have to pay the bills and buy the groceries and clean the house and make the meals that nobody wants to eat.

And oh yeah, don’t forget you are a full-time teacher. You have to plan the lessons, prepare to teach, and sit down with each child while the others run amok. Then the toddler makes a mess all over the floor while you were doing spelling with your first grader, and everything must be put on hold while you solve the problem.

We give and give until there is nothing left of ourselves, until we are empty. We handle the chores, cook the meals, teach the lessons, drive everyone to their special piano lessons and soccer practice, rush home to make dinner, tuck the kids into bed, and then drag them out of bed in the morning to start it all over again.

Yet we chose to home school because we value a family where community and creativity our nurtured, where there is joy and warmth and rest, where you are not running from one event to the next. Hidden in our hearts, a small spark, a little wish for something deeper, something more eternal, waits to blossom.

We cannot change anyone. We can only change ourselves. To move our families in the right direction, we must first move ourselves in that direction and trust that they will follow. These twelve life principles are lessons I have learned and forgotten and then reapplied to my life many times over.

1. Get up while the house is still quiet. Get your breakfast. Get your shower. Have a moment to drink your coffee and plan your day. You are worth the extra effort to take care of yourself before you start to serve others. If you let them wake you, you will be 10 steps behind the rest of the day. And you will be too tired and grumpy to tackle the day’s challenges.

If the children wake up before you are ready, send them back to bed. As a home schooling family, you can set your own schedule. Let them read in bed for half an hour or play quietly until you are ready.

2. Ignore criticisms and unwelcome advice. Busy bodies everywhere have their opinions about what you should or should not be doing. I’d like to say they mean well, but I’m really not so sure about that. Most of them just want to feel better about their own selves by tearing someone else down, and very few actually know what they are talking about.

3. Keep a journal. Write your thoughts and contemplate yourself. Take the time to recognize your emotional state. Emotions are often warning messages, helping you know when to rest and when something is not healthy. Take the time to ask yourself who you really are. Knowing and finding yourself are integral for good parenting.

4. Explore your own creative aspects. We have arts and crafts for the kids, music lessons for the kids, and writing essays for the kids. If developing the arts is so important for your kids, is it not just as important for you? You want your kids to be well-rounded, right? So don’t be a hypocrite, and you will find your kids being more willing to jump into their lessons, following your example.

5. Never stop learning. Try new things. Check out books from the library to explore a new hobby and study something you’ve always wanted to know. Your brain is a powerful tool. Whatever style of home schooling you may have, you can always unschool yourself.

6. Eat lunch. And have a snack. At the end of the day, I find that I snap more. Why? I don’t feel hungry, but once I’ve eaten dinner my mood improves. We are finite people. Only God is infinite, and we are dependent on water, food, and God to nourish our lives. So don’t be a martyr and eat something.

7. Insist on an afternoon break. Children need downtime in order to have unscheduled, undirected play. No matter how old your children are, it is good for them and you that everyone gets quiet time alone. Send them to their rooms to read or outside to play, but enforce the rule that you are not to be disturbed during this time.

8. Find time to exercise. Just as it is not your wish for your children to be unhealthy, it is not God’s wish for you either. He cherishes you just as you cherish your children. Parental duties and home schooling should never get in the way of this. Keep it fun, and find a routine that fits into your schedule. Maybe fit it in during your morning quiet hour or during the afternoon break. Or get workout videos that the kids can do with you.

9. Take quiet walks frequently. Not for the purpose of exercise. Not for some goal. Just for the chance to meander and to be quiet. To have solitude. To explore. Adults are goal-oriented. Everything we do has a purpose, whether it is to cook dinner, buy groceries, pay the bills, diet, or get some exercise. We are always striving. Sometimes, we just need to put that aside. So trade favors with your spouse, and take a little time each week.

10. Find time to play. Be a kid again. Children are experience-oriented. They do stuff for the simple joy of being. Growing up has made us lose that eternal quality of just being. Sometimes, we just need to enjoy the experience.

11. Never let life become a competition. We compete to be the best mom, to be the best dresser, the best decorator, the best friend, the most organized, the best scrapbooker, the most creative, the most athletic, the most beautiful. But when I stop to contemplate this, I realize that my value really has no bearing on anyone else. Parents celebrate their child’s first steps, however wobbly those steps may be. In the same way, we should celebrate our own wobbly attempts to grow.

12. Learn to say “No.” Sometimes, one more activity, one more responsibility, or one more event is just one too many. Instead, choose to say “Yes” to being home, to spending time with family, or to enjoying a dinner around the table.