Promotional Pens Bring Great Business Returns

The returns of any business determines its progress. The bigger the return, the better the business flourishes in terms of financial gain, publicity and productivity. The use of products that is much prevalent these days may have at once crossed your mind. But can you figure out which one you must choose to maximise your business returns? It is an expert advise that you must go for promotional pens.

Let us see how personalised pens act as the best promotional gifts yielding optimum output-

Cost efficacious:

The promotional pens are far inexpensive than almost all other items. This increases the purchasing power of the business bodies. They are able to procure more number of them within the same budget amount. This resultantly helps them in reaching an increased audience base in the stipulated media budget. In the bulk purchase of these promotional pens, you will get good discounts as well which adds on to its cost effectiveness. Thus, we see how advantageous they are in cutting down brand advertisement cost.

Portable:

We know that pens are extremely handy in nature. This quality takes them to an additional number of audience than is actually targeted by their distribution among a specified set in certain campaign. The core recipients of the promotional pens take them to different places in their course of professional and personal visit. When they use them in this new environment, the brand ignorant or non-catered audience present there comes in term with the brand identity imprinted on them. This is how the printed pens carry the brand recognition across geographical boundaries and gain in huge potential audience without any additional expense.

Appreciation:

Personalised pens are used efficiently as appreciation techniques. Presented to the internal employees as incentives, festive gifts or prizes in in-house competitions, they act as appreciatory objects. It is a material form of a pat on the back which motivates them to work sincerely. The resultant effect is that of an enhanced productivity in aspects of quantity, quality and on-time shipment. When gifted to the business associates, promotional pens behave as a token of thanks for their support in the smooth execution of business operation. This helps in building a good-will and thus a longer business relationship between the two. Giving promotional pens to the end-users as complementary gifts with the main product, develops an association between the brand and the consumers. This is what motivates them to go for further brand purchase and mark high brand sales.

For know more about higher return on investment trait of promotional gifts , visit online stores.

The 5 Golden Rules of Business Body Language

The guidelines that you bear in mind and never forget about are classified as the Golden rules that always apply. Like torches to guide us in the dark of night, they shine vividly to keep us on course and always propelling in the correct direction.

Golden Rules exist to get used, to be followed religiously, and to show you how. Regardless of what your main purpose is or what challenge you face, the rule is there to latch onto if you start to veer off track. Just find the Golden Rule that applies and abide by it.

Listed here are the 5 Golden Rules of business body language.

Rule # 1.

People usually lean forward and “into you” when they are really interested in what you are presenting, saying, proposing, etc. The rationale behind that is that unconsciously, we lean toward what we like. So, the next time you’re really interested in something someone is saying, take a quick second to check your own body language. You may find that you are actually leaning forward and are glad-fully engaged. Furthermore, the next time you are at a seminar, show, or lecture, look around at other people when interesting or captivating things take place. This observation can help you next time you are pitching your product/service or offering a good suggestion to a potential client.

Rule # 2.

When a person’s shoulder blades are not in line with your own, they are preoccupied. Ever talk to a person who is conversing with you but their body seems to be facing as if they’re set to move past you?

First of all, give them a mental credit for speaking to you while they’re really focused on their next meeting, assignment, errand, etc. Remember that they probably mean well but something in the back (or front) of their mind has got them anxious to fly.

Many times this happens if you happen to catch someone who is on their way somewhere and has stopped to have a few words with you. If this happens when at a networking event or during a one on one sales presentation, you may have to use your smooth gift of gab to help them to focus completely on what you are displaying. As you speak, notice their shoulders coming in line with yours.

Rule # 3.
Arms Folded. This could indicate a person feeling uncomfortable of anxious. A lot of people fold their arms when they are calculating, weighing the facts, and are not feeling confident about the answers.

This could be due to something you are saying, the way you are saying it, or even an individuals general mistrust of you. Not to be taken as offense, you may just need to know each other a little better and establish trust. If the same happens with a person you know reasonably well, it is probably the first reason or just a general feeling of discomfort.

Rule # 4.
Two people talking with their shoulder blades parallel. Have you ever been at a business function and noticed two people talking with their shoulder blades in perfect alignment? This is a good indication that they are involved in a serious or interesting conversation. The aligned shoulder blades say that they are closing the doors to interruption at least temporarily.

Notice that when the same conversation is coming to a close, their shoulder blades and general position of their bodies begin to face an exiting direction. This happens even before the conversation ends. When you are out at business networking events, it’s a sign to now approach without being intrusive.

Rule # 5.
Person is completely facing you but frequently looking away. Usually when a person is completely engaged in a subject, all elements of their being will reflect this. The same holds true when in conversation. Take a look at the person in your next few interactions. Are they giving you regular eye contact?

Typically, when not looking you in the eye, they will say something that exhibits the fact that they are listening or are engaged. If they are constantly looking over your shoulder or into the background, chances are, they are preoccupied.

Once again, don’t be offended, just acknowledge this and pick up the talk at another time if possible. This also depends on the priority level of the talk as well. You will want initiate this carefully and not offend anyone as you cut the conversation short.

You can trust and believe in these Golden Rules to help you better understand business body language. They’ve been time-tested and also have been proved to be true. Follow them carefully and your ultimate success will likely be assured as well as your communications much greater.

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Is this A Good Time To Sell Your Body Shop Business?

Have you ever asked yourself the question? “Is this a good time to sell my business?” That is a question every business owner asks himself, every time he has a bad day. I once received e-mail from the editor of the Auto Body News, asking me that key question. “What is happening in the market today? Is this a good time to sell? ” My quick answer was “These are very interesting times.”

Of course that answer doesn’t tell you anything that you can get your teeth into. So! Let me clarify my answer. Since I have been selling body shops for nearly 5 years, I have seen many changes in the body shop industry. One thing that hasn’t changed is that there have always been an abundance of both sellers and buyers. The buyers have always been, and still are picky about what they were looking for.

The perfect shop in the eyes to the buyers is (A) one that has a customer base and a revenue stream that is reliable and isn’t dependent on the owner being there to retain each individual customer, and. (B) doing a volume of at least $100,000 per month, but really much more. Large volume sellers think that if they have a DRP (Direct Repair Program. This is where the insurance companies set up a relationship with the body shop to do all their clients business. Much like an HMO in health insurance) contract, they have what the buyers want.

This may be true but the contracts are not automatically transferable, and a buyer will be very unhappy if the DRP leaves after paying money for this “reliable revenue stream.” Smaller volume sellers, on the other-hand, not having corporate accounts, dealerships or other contracts still have hopes of getting lot of money for their shops. The average shop I run across is only doing about $300,000-$500,000 annual gross income. So what we have is a situation where a lot of buyers are looking to buy a shop, but there are not a lot of shops available, that fit what they are interested in.

This year, one change has occurred. There are fewer shops available than at any time in my career. Not fewer of the large volume shops for sale, that is fairly stable, but fewer of the small mom and pop repair shops that have not been in heavy demand. The reason, I believe this has happened is because of the booming economy. Low volume shops are doing better than they have in years. They are making money, and do not feel as much pressure to close down. They still would like to get out, but when they find out that their 5,000 sq. foot shop which is making them a $100,000 net profit, is only worth $100,000 on the open market they decide to keep on working.

As always, the shops doing $1 Million to $3 Million per year gross income is still in demand. The price alone still is the main factor, in determining if these shops will sell. A good example of this is what is happening in lower Orange County. There are currently a couple of shops in Lower Orange County that are for sale, by the owners. They appear to be very profitable but the asking price is too high and the buyers all know it. Even the fact that these are the only shops available for sale in this prime area has not changed the fact that buyers just refuse to over pay.

Last year I was marketing a high volume shop, in Ventura County. The buyers refused to pay the asking price, even though the volume was there. Why? The profit wasn’t. In this situation, the buyers would not pay for the volume and stability of income unless the net profits were there. They didn’t assume that they would make a profit where the current owner was not. It appears that buyers of today are very careful. I believe they do not trust their own ability to get business and are too careful.

To clear up any confusion about what kind of buyers we are talking about, lets break the buyers up into categories. The first category is the consolidators. There are two large ones in Southern California but they are not the whole market. I have talked to out of state consolidators that have inquired about moving in to the So California market. Consolidators want shops that fit their model. That model sometimes changes but basically they will buy a shop if it fits their model.

If it doesn’t, they will not touch it. The price by itself doesn’t turn their interest on or off. We do not have enough space to discuss what this group will buy, in this article. It is enough to say, ” If your shop fits their criteria they would have contacted you and expressed interest. If they haven’t contacted you, they are not interested.” Period! They know their market place and who is in it.

By the way, if I owned a shop that a consolidator wanted, I would never sell to them. Being a professional negotiator for 20 years, I find the requested seller financing terms totally unacceptable. When I have found out about these sales, after the fact, I am amazed. I had buyers for the same money, or more, without the seller being at risk, but no one asked me.

The second category is the multiple location shop owners. Usually with one or more DRP contracts shop that wants to expand into more areas. They are very interested in the sq. footage of the shop, and its ability to handle over $2. Million Gross Income per year. This buyer only looks in limited areas. The areas being where they have been offered a DRP contract. When they are looking, they need it now, while the window of opportunity is open to them. If they can’t find it quick, they will not need it at all. Recently I had a multiple shop buyer who had made an offer and was negotiating a shop in West Los Angeles. By the time we finished the negotiations, the DRP contract was gone and so was the buyer.

The third category is the buyers who have worked in the industry before, but do not currently own a shop. Also in this group are the buyers who have family in the industry, and money is no problem. This buyer believes ” If it doesn’t have a DRP, forget it. If it has a DRP and isn’t making much money, also forget it”. If it has a DRP, and it is making money, they are interested but only at what they consider is a fair price (In their eyes). This group I have successfully changed their mind at how they analyze what a good shop looks like and on occasion have bought shops with “a steady reliable income”, other than insurance contracts.

The fourth category is the person that just wants a shop. They will do what they have to, to afford a shop that will work for them. This group is the working body man or auto repair shop mechanic. Because of their limited funds, this buyer will only pay what he or she feels the equipment is worth. They will pay nothing for goodwill because they believe that the seller’s customers are not stable and will leave when the ownership changes. Are they wrong?

In Conclusion: There are a lot of buyers out there. My database has over 250 current names of body shop buyers. There is currently a shortage of shops for sale but mostly in the properly priced category. Most days I feel like a marriage broker with a lot of plain brides and a few beauties. The dowry for the beauties is more than most good-looking boys will pay. The balance of the girls may not be pretty, but some of them can sure cook. . Anyone want to get married? “Have I got a girl for you”